Florian Seidel

Florian Seidel

is a director and photographer.

He began his career as a photographer in the fashion and music industry.
After countless music videos and successful independent projects, he entered the international brand world – initially as a freelance director & photographer.

Later on him and his wife Claudette founded their own boutique production house: studioseidel.de.

Their vision was (and still is) to confront the world and all its brands with a different point of view. They always strive to provide a slightly different perspective on things, products and life in general.

Florian has won numerous awards with his versatile, unique projects which are characterized by a deep passion for craft in every step of the way. He often works with real, touchable things and materials that actually exist in the real world; although they might look like from another planet and are being transformed or brought to life digitally later on in a project.

Some of his photographs are now for sale.

The first special edition "City" is a series of 18 motifs. Take a look below and find out more about the project at the bottom of this page.

Each picture, wallpaper & video is available in different sizes and editions.

(City:)
(City:)

The photo project "City" comprises 18 motifs with variations in different and scalable formats.
The pictures were taken on Florian’s many trips over the years from hotel rooms, street corners and, above all, location recces.

The mesmerizing images show anonymous and seemingly simple silos of houses, each with well over 20 storeys high.
On closer inspection, however, this architecture develops a detailed life of its own.

In a process lasting several years, the house fronts were deconstructed in detail.

A complex digital copying process (without PS-composing, effect filters or the use of AI) that finally leads to extreme reduction into an abstract graphic pattern.
The real look of the house fronts are transformed into an artificial looking – but at the heart very real – photography that almost comes accross like a painting or a graphic.
Reassembled in a copy-paste technique of the full image, it results in a different pattern when viewed from a distance.

Yet on closer inspection you can feel the street again and hear the rhythm of the timeline.